Austin Premier Dental

NEWS AND ANNOUNCEMENTS

Dr. Bruce Silva and his team at Austin Premier Dental are dedicated to providing high-quality and compassionate dental health care.


pexels-photo-235052-1200x800.jpeg
January 16, 2017

A recent survey compiled by Colgate found that 47%, almost half, of surveyed young women (aged 24-35) brush their teeth once a day, if that, and admit to having “poor” oral health. Of the 1,007 women surveyed, only 8% said they had “excellent” oral health, and half of all women surveyed said they don’t get regular dental check-ups.

No matter your gender or age, nothing should get in the way of regular dental check-ups, which translates to visiting the dentist at least once a year. It may be perceived that going to the dentist is like going to the doctor – you don’t need to go unless you have an issue. But frequent dental check-ups are all about preventing problems.

Although we highly recommend going to the dentist for a routine check-up, there are a few easy ways to care for your teeth on your own. For instance, don’t brush your teeth too hard. You can wear away your enamel. Keep a soft brush and brush gently. Remove or limit the amount of acidic foods in your diet. This includes diet sodas, sweeteners, and fruits. Floss regularly, and finally, brush your teeth at least twice a day or after every meal, but especially before bedtime. At night, there is less saliva in your mouth so there is less protection. And did you know that electric toothbrushes are better at removing plaque than your standard toothbrush? They’re more expensive, but worth it.

Maintaining a healthy dental hygiene is not just important for your oral health but for other parts of your body. Poor oral health is associated with major chronic diseases and it can cause disability. Oral health issues and major diseases share common risk factors. Finally, general health problems may cause or worsen oral health conditions.

Nothing’s more important than your health so call Austin Premier Dental today to schedule a check-up with Dr. Bruce Silva!


child-1260411_960_720.jpg
August 11, 2016

School is about to start up again and your child has some necessities. Along with getting new clothes, new shoes, and school supplies, you need to take a trip to the dentist’s office so your child has a healthy smile before heading back to class. Here’s a brief back-to-school checklist.

  1. Schedule (Another) Check-Up

A study from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention states that tooth decay affects U.S. children more than any other chronic infectious disease and 19 percent of children ages 2 to 19 years old have untreated tooth decay. So don’t just visit your child’s dentist during the summer. Schedule regular dental examinations to diagnose or prevent any dental problems. Regular checkups are important because your child may not bring up any tooth pain and teachers are unlikely to notice your child’s dental problems. By scheduling dental checkups often, you’ll prevent your child from losing school time.

  1. Make Sure They Brush and Floss

Have your child brush and floss often. While you’re out scrounging for school supplies, stock up on toothbrushes and dental floss for the school year. You’ll want to change toothbrushes every three months or after encountering a sickness. An easy way to remember when to switch out a toothbrush is to do so when report cards come out. You might also want to ask your dentist the best time to change toothbrushes for your child’s teeth.

  1. Watch What They Eat & How They Play

Make sure your child is eating healthy lunches and snacks. Avoid sugary foods and soft drinks. If you pack a sack lunch, include foods like grains, milk, cheese, vegetables, fruits, and yogurt. If your child eats in the school cafeteria, discuss with your child some healthy options to eat when not under your supervision. Also, if your child is involved in sports, have them wear a properly fitted mouth guard while participating in sports and PE classes.

Your child’s dental problems can lead to difficulty in eating, speaking, and learning. Prevent it by visiting their dentist every four months. For any questions concerning your child’s healthy smile, give Dr. Silva a call at (512) 605-0860.


C3LZFS20XN-1200x763.jpg
June 9, 2016

You know candy and chocolate can be damaging to your healthy smile. But, what else? There are two main food components that are detrimental to your teeth: sugar and acid.

Bacteria feast on your plaque buildup created by your sugar consumption and produce lactic acid, which erodes your tooth enamel. Sucrose is the worst form of sugar because it adheres to teeth very strongly making it, and the bacteria, difficult to remove even when brushing.

Acids naturally occur in many foods, including fruit. Acidic foods eat away at your enamel and break down your teeth directly. You can wash away natural acids by just drinking water. However, brushing soon after consuming acidic foods or beverages can actually cause more damage because teeth are permeable, brushing softens them and makes them more susceptible to acid. Wait at least an hour before brushing after eating acidic foods.

 

Believe it or not, the following 10 foods can be the most damaging to your teeth.

Apples

Apples are very high in acid. Be sure to rinse your mouth with water or mouthwash shortly after.

Hard candies

Hard candies are especially harmful because we tend to hold them in our mouths longer.

Pickled vegetables

Pickles are made with vinegar, which is acidic. Vegetables may be healthy but the brine can damage your teeth. Remember to brush an hour later.

Bread

Many breads contain sugar, especially processed white breads. Bread is also sticky and gets between and behind your teeth.

Popcorn

Popcorn gets stuck in your teeth, and the areas between your teeth will build up more bacteria for that reason. Rinse your mouth with water and floss after.

Peanut Butter

Sticky and often made with sugar, peanut butter not only feeds bacteria but makes it easier for them to adhere to teeth.

 Jelly

Just like peanut butter, jelly is loaded with sugar. Even the all-fruit brands contain natural sugars and encourage plaque and bacteria if not washed away soon.

Meat

Some meat products contain sugar as a preservative and gets stuck in between your teeth. While the amount of sugar may not be very high, any food that sits between your teeth can promote tooth decay.

Diet Soda

The acidity of diet sodas is very high, making it one of the worst products for your teeth.

Salad dressing

Salad dressings are composed of vinegar and sugar for flavor.

 

While many of these foods are healthy, you should try and care for your teeth soon after eating them. Drinking water with your meal and rinsing with an alcohol-free fluoride mouthwash or flossing and brushing with toothpaste reduces the risk of damage.

Furthermore, consider the length of time food is left in your mouth. The more time bacteria have to produce acids, the more damage will be done.

So, watch what you eat and drink and don’t forget to call us when you’re ready to schedule your dental cleaning appointment.


SilvaBlog2Image_May.jpg
May 23, 2016

A study conducted in 2013 stated that 63% of Americans are actively avoiding the consumption of soda on a regular basis. That’s a major increase from 2002, where only 41% of Americans were avoiding soda. Still, that leaves a lot of people consuming high-sugar soft drinks, which are closely associated with obesity, type 2 diabetes, and tooth decay. Soft drinks can have some negative effects on your teeth and here’s what you can do to prevent damage to your healthy smile.

There are two main effects of drinking soda: erosion and cavities. If you drink soda or other sugary drinks all day, your teeth are always under attack by the acids created by the sugars and the bacteria in your mouth. Erosion begins when the acids in soft drinks encounter the tooth enamel (the outermost protective layer on your teeth) and they begin to reduce the surface hardness of the enamel. Unlike sports drinks and fruit juices, sodas also affect the next layer, dentin, and even composite fillings. The damage done can invite cavities, which develop over time in people who drink soft drinks regularly. When combined with poor oral care, the results can be dreadful.

If you’re attempting to find a solution to prevent cavities, then stop drinking soda altogether. If you’re unable to quit soft drinks cold-turkey, then you do have other options. Drink in moderation. Don’t have more than one soft drink each day. Drink soda faster. The faster you drink, the less time the sugars and acids have to damage your teeth. If you use a straw, this will keep the acids and sugars away from your teeth. Rinse your mouth with water after drinking a soda but don’t brush your teeth. The friction against your sugar-coated teeth can do more harm than good. Instead, wait 30 to 60 minutes to brush. Don’t drink sodas at bedtime because this will keep the sugar and acids attacking your teeth all night. And finally, visit the dentist regularly.

If you feel your teeth have suffered due to sugary drinks, schedule an appointment HERE or call Dr. Bruce Silva today at (512) 605-0860 for more information on tooth decay.






Get in touch

Contact us for your next appointment!


CALL US!

512-605-0860


VISIT TODAY!

2550 Interstate 35, Suite 210
Austin, TX 78704


Just For You

Specials and Promotions


  • Free teeth whitening kit with dental exam, x-rays, and cleaning.
  • $50 toward 1st dental visit (no cash value). NEW PATIENTS ONLY*

Reduced cost for patients without insurance.


Follow us

On Social Media



Copyright by Dr. Bruce Silva 2017. All rights reserved.

Bruce Silva D.D.S. Austin Dentist